Panoglview

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[[Image:Panoglview.png|thumb|200px|panoglview on Linux]]'''panoglview''' is an OpenGL hardware accelerated immersive viewer for [[equirectangular]] images, originally created by  
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[[Image:Panoglview.png|thumb|200px|panoglview on Linux]]'''panoglview''' is an OpenGL hardware accelerated immersive viewer for [[equirectangular]] images, originally created by Fabian Wenzel and currently hosted on the [http://sf.net/projects/hugin hugin sourceforge site].
Fabian Wenzel and currently hosted on the [http://sf.net/projects/hugin hugin sourceforge site].
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The license for '''panoglview''' is the [http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html#SEC1 GNU General Public License (GPL)].
 
The license for '''panoglview''' is the [http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html#SEC1 GNU General Public License (GPL)].
  
You can download pre-compiled versions of '''panoglview''' as part of the [[hugin]] installer bundles for OS X and Windows.  '''panoglview''' is available for linux distributions through the usual channels.
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You can download pre-compiled versions of '''panoglview''' as part of the [[hugin]] installer bundles for OS X and Windows.  '''panoglview''' is available for linux distributions through the usual channels (e.g [http://www.getdeb.net/app/PanoGLview ubuntu getdeb] March 2009).
 
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== compiling panoglview ==
 
== compiling panoglview ==
  
requirements...
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See [[Hugin Compiling Ubuntu#Panoglview]].
  
 
== using panoglview ==
 
== using panoglview ==
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Panoglview is intended to view full 180x360 (equirectangular) panoramas projected onto a globe which can be spun around using the mouse.
 
Panoglview is intended to view full 180x360 (equirectangular) panoramas projected onto a globe which can be spun around using the mouse.
  
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For viewing a partial panorama, you use project files.  There are no examples in the distribution, but they can be created by opening an equirectangular image and saving a .paf 'project'.
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These are simple text files and fairly self-explanatory, but the interesting thing is that these .paf files contain stuff like camera field-of-view, pan, tilt, boundaries and now partial panorama settings.
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== as a replacement for PTEditor ==
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[[PTEditor]] is an older unsupported tool for viewing a panorama, extracting undistorted views for external editing and reinserting those edited views. The '''panoglview''' .paf saving feature can be used to imitate this functionality in conjunction with the [http://search.cpan.org/dist/Panotools-Script/bin/pafextract pafextract] tool.
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The [http://www.flickr.com/photos/36383814@N00/2845671569/ pafextract workflow] goes something like this:
  
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# open a panorama in '''panoglview'''
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# find a viewpoint to edit, save a .paf viewpoint
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# extract a bitmap image of this view with pafextract
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# edit it with the [[gimp]] or another image editor, save
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# remap this using the .pto project created by pafextract
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# merge with the panorama
  
 
[[Category:Software:Platform:Windows]]
 
[[Category:Software:Platform:Windows]]

Latest revision as of 23:32, 31 March 2009

panoglview on Linux
panoglview is an OpenGL hardware accelerated immersive viewer for equirectangular images, originally created by Fabian Wenzel and currently hosted on the hugin sourceforge site.

The license for panoglview is the GNU General Public License (GPL).

You can download pre-compiled versions of panoglview as part of the hugin installer bundles for OS X and Windows. panoglview is available for linux distributions through the usual channels (e.g ubuntu getdeb March 2009).

[edit] compiling panoglview

See Hugin Compiling Ubuntu#Panoglview.

[edit] using panoglview

Panoglview is intended to view full 180x360 (equirectangular) panoramas projected onto a globe which can be spun around using the mouse.

For viewing a partial panorama, you use project files. There are no examples in the distribution, but they can be created by opening an equirectangular image and saving a .paf 'project'.

These are simple text files and fairly self-explanatory, but the interesting thing is that these .paf files contain stuff like camera field-of-view, pan, tilt, boundaries and now partial panorama settings.

[edit] as a replacement for PTEditor

PTEditor is an older unsupported tool for viewing a panorama, extracting undistorted views for external editing and reinserting those edited views. The panoglview .paf saving feature can be used to imitate this functionality in conjunction with the pafextract tool.

The pafextract workflow goes something like this:

  1. open a panorama in panoglview
  2. find a viewpoint to edit, save a .paf viewpoint
  3. extract a bitmap image of this view with pafextract
  4. edit it with the gimp or another image editor, save
  5. remap this using the .pto project created by pafextract
  6. merge with the panorama
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